47 Awesome Stretching Exercises and Stretching Routines

August 01, 2016

If you’re reading this, it’s likely you’re someone looking for some guidance and direction when it comes to stretching. And let me start by saying, congratulations on getting this far.

I know that may sound a little weird, considering all you’ve done is open an article entitled “47 Awesome Stretching Exercises and Stretching Routines.” But a big problem in the fitness world is that way too many people see some informative content about stretching — maybe a video, a slideshow, or an article just like this — and they keep moving right along, never giving it a thought. That’s not to say you should absorb every single piece of information about stretching that comes your way. But it does highlight the problem to which I just eluded: not enough people make stretching a priority.

Now, from what I can tell, there hasn’t been any conclusive research to back up this claim — I’ll admit that outright. I’ve looked, but I can’t seem to find any major surveys on the percentage of people that do or do not stretch regularly. But every single day, I see the symptoms and consequences of people who don’t stretch: a parent wincing as they bend over to pick up their child; an athlete moving gingerly the day after a game or exhaustive activity; even people who absentmindedly rub various parts of their bodies (wrists, shoulders, back, etc.) throughout the day. Stretching should be a regular routine for just about everyone. Unfortunately, that’s just not the case.

I think the biggest problem facing why people don’t stretch is largely the same reason so many people don’t exercise, which is lack of time. Most people have pretty full plates as it is, and they don’t feel they can fit a stretching routine into their schedule. Some people think of stretching as an optional addition to an exercise, to be done if time and energy permits. And furthermore, a lot of people may not think they would benefit at all from stretching. So then it’s just one more time-consuming, meaningless activity that’s best left avoided altogether. That is the attitude I’m hoping to change with this article.

It’s my belief (and the belief of countless health and fitness experts) that a proper stretching routine can help you enjoy all of these benefits. That’s why I have gone through all my years of training, study and practice to put together my ultimate list of stretching exercises and stretching routines. Here’s a quick rundown on everything this article will entail:

A good stretching routine can do wonders for managing your stress, so one of the first things I’m going to equip you with is your “Stretch Tool Belt.” These are six tools that you may not be considering when stretching, but they’re going to play a vital role in reducing your stress levels. There’s no extra training here — you already know about each of these tools. Now you’re going to know when it’s time to use them.

And from there, we get the ball rolling, where I show you awesome, effective stretching exercises for just about every muscle group and every facet of your daily life. If you’re looking for helpful back stretches that will alleviate pain and give you more flexibility, we’ve got them. We’re sharing a variety of  leg stretches, great for runners and non-runners alike. If there’s a part of your body you think could use a little more flexibility, you’re about to find out how to get it. And for each specific stretch, you’ll see how long you need to hold the stretch, what part of the body you’re targeting, and what type of stretch it is (more on the types of stretching in just a minute).

What if you’re looking for a morning/nighttime stretching routine? Or some stretching exercises you can do right at your desk? Or how about some stretches you can do while you watch TV, or are on an airplane? Yep, all that and much, much more is right here.

If you’re new to A Shot of Adrenaline: first of all, welcome! Second, you should know that everything we do is steeped in the discipline of calisthenics. That means we don’t rely on any equipment other than our own bodies. So you won’t need any ropes, foam rollers, resistance bands or any other equipment for any of these exercises. You’ve already got all the tools you need! Third, we believe exercise should be fun, challenging, and effective, and we try to stay true to that with everything we do. And we hope that as you continue with this stretching routine — and all of our other awesome programs — you’ll feel the same way!

So before we go any further, let’s take a fundamental approach to understanding stretching as a whole, the different ways to stretch, and what it can do for you.

What is Stretching?

stretching

Stretching can be defined simply as “elongation or lengthening of muscle fibers.” There are a few basic types of stretching that every massage therapist should know. This list will mainly cover the first three types of stretching listed below, but I think it’s important to educate you on the other stretching varieties outside this article.

The first type of stretch is called the static stretch. Static stretches are done slowly and usually held for at least 20 to 30 seconds. There are two types of static stretching, active and passive. Active stretching is when you perform the stretch. Passive stretching involves a partner helping you through a stretch and can be a very effective way of developing flexibility. However, there must be good communication between both people by letting your partner know when you feel the slightest amount of discomfort. This will decrease the chance of injury.

The next type of stretching is called dynamic stretching, which involves movement and lengthening of the muscle through a full range of motion. A good example of dynamic stretching in sports is swimming. In the water, a swimmer will bring their shoulders through a full range of motion, creating a good stretch and incredible flexibility through movement.

Another type of dynamic stretching is oscillatory stretching. The benefits of oscillatory stretching are tremendous and can be done with all major joints of the body. Oscillatory stretching is a back and forth motion of the joint through its full range of motion. This method of stretching should be done slowly and should not be taken past one’s full range of motion. This article has many examples of oscillatory stretches and can be used by most people for overall joint health. When people who have very low flexibility are doing oscillatory stretching, it is important that they move through a full range of motion, but not to the point that they feel pain. Working with arthritic patients, I have found that, even when they move through a small range of motion, it decreases inflammation and pain dramatically. There is, however, an exception to this rule: when working with someone that feels pain — whether they are moving or not — it is important to get them moving, even if it is painful at first, assuming that that the problem is not a significant injury like a broken bone. Oscillatory stretching would be very beneficial for this type of person because it helps lubricate the joint with synovial fluid and helps decrease pain.

The next type of stretching is called active isolated stretching. Many massage therapists and highly trained athletes incorporate this type of stretching into their daily routine. Active isolated stretching involves having a muscle contract against some form of resistance, then having the muscle relax, followed by bringing it slightly past its full range of motion into a stretched state, holding it there for no longer than two seconds, finally bringing it back to a neutral, non-stretched state. It is very important to not hold the stretch for longer than two seconds. Otherwise, the muscle will contract trying to protect itself from being over-stretched. I do not recommend this type of stretching for clients or anyone in a rehabilitative state because there is a high risk of tissue damage.

The last type of stretch is the ballistic stretch. Many people do this type of stretch incorrectly. It is normally defined as “quickly bouncing in and out of a stretched state.” This way of stretching will almost surely tear a muscle or put it into spasm. However, the correct way to do a ballistic stretch is to slowly come to a stretched state, relax, then purposely and slowly oscillate back and forth. Again, I’m stressing that this should be done in a slow and relaxed manner. With the right intent, this can be a very effective way to stretch.

Why Stretch?

U.S. Army Materiel Command Noncommissioned Officer of the Year Sgt. Douglas McBroom, foreground, stretches and warms up prior to the start of the Department of the Army Best Warrior Competition double-elimination combatives tournament at Fort Lee, Va., Oct. 7, 2011. (U.S. Army phot

There are many health benefits that will be gained once someone begins a regular stretch training routine; however, developing great flexibility is a process and takes time and dedication. Just a few of the many benefits you will experience once you begin a stretching routine include:

  • Increased range of motion in your joints
  • Decrease in muscle pain caused by inflammation
  • Decreased chance of injury due to sport related activities
  • Decreased chance of injury due to everyday activities, such as getting out of bed.
  • Assisted prevention in muscle imbalance
  • Promotes blood circulation
  • Decreased joint pain due to inflammatory conditions such as tendinitis
  • Stress relief (see the Stretch Tool Belt below!)
  • Just overall makes you feel better!

Stretching for Pain Relief

Will stretching help reduce pain?

When you are stressed, your muscles tighten in response to the fight-or-flight response. Over time, the constant tension turns into dense muscle tissue called fibrosis. This fibrosis impinges on nerves in the neck, low back and other areas. If you have ever had a massage, you may have noticed that you typically feel better afterward. For example, you visit a massage therapist because you have neck pain. Afterward, your neck pain is gone.

There is a physiological reason for this. Before the massage, there were dense muscle fibers caused by stress. The massage therapist, through massage and stretching, “broke up” the muscle tissue and the nerves were no longer impinged. This is why stretching is such an effective technique for relieving pain in the muscles.

Should stretching hurt?

Stretching should not hurt. If you are feeling pain during a stretch you should stop immediately. At the start of a stretch you will feel pulling on the muscle. This must happen in order for the muscle to lengthen. Typically as you relax into a stretch the tension will decrease and you will be able to go further into the stretch.

Your Stretch Tool Belt: Six Tools for Maximum Stress Relief

Berlin, italienische Polizeiführer, Sport

There are six powerful tools in your arsenal that can be effectively used for battling stress. These six tools can be implemented at a moment’s notice and can have a profound effect on eliminating stress. When combined together, these tools create a fortress of protection against the onslaught of stress.

Tool #1: Breathing

The first tool in your Stress Relief Tool Belt is breathing. Breathing is one of the most important elements of stress relief. As I’ve mentioned before, breathing should be done from your lower belly.

Take a moment to watch how a sleeping baby breathes. The baby breathes deeply from the low belly. This is known as diaphragmatic breathing. The diaphragm is a muscle used to control breathing. When you become stressed, tension usually builds up around the rib cage, which makes it more difficult for the diaphragm to work. As the muscles in between the rib cage tighten, it makes it more difficult for the lungs to expand. This decreases the amount of oxygen you are breathing in. The body then tries to compensate by expanding the chest to bring more room into the rib cage for the lungs to expand. This allows the lungs to expand more. However, it is not conducive to proper breathing, because it forces you to start relying on “chest breathing.”

The most effective way to breathe is through your lower belly. One way to understand proper breathing is to practice the following technique:

Place your left hand on your belly just below your navel. Then place your right hand over your left hand. Begin to breathe so that your lower belly expands in a way that lifts your hands. While you breathe in, your hands will be coming out. While you breathe out, your hands will come back in. This is the proper way to breathe. Your chest and shoulders should not rise while you perform this exercise. Only your belly and hands will be moving. During your stretching routines, you should place your attention on this type of breathing. It will help you relax into a stretch as well as calm your thoughts.

Tool #2: Relaxation

Relaxation is the next tool used to manage stress. It is important to remember that a muscle will only stretch when it is relaxed. If you try to force a muscle to lengthen, it will cause micro-tears in the muscle tissue. This is counterproductive to stress management. The level of relaxation of a muscle is under your conscious control. Breathing and relaxation are closely tied together. You can use the above breathing technique to relax your body. For example, the exhalation part of a breath is a great time to let all your muscles relax. The important thing to realize is that you can not force a muscle to relax and stretch. Use effective breathing and let your muscles relax in a natural way.

Tool #3: Focus

Most people’s minds have many distractions running through it on a constant basis. In order to maximize your efforts in managing your stress, it is essential you focus your mind. Keeping your mind in the present moment helps to eliminate mental distractions. When you go through your daily stretching routines, take time to keep your mind focused on the movements. There is no need to think about your work or laundry or any other activity. When you are breathing in, focus on breathing in. When you are breathing out, keep your mind centered on breathing out. This will help facilitate the stretches to give you the greatest benefit.

Think about a samurai for a moment. Most people know they are masters of using weapons like the sword; however, they have had to practice for long periods of time before they became proficient with it. While doing your stretches, think of your self as a samurai. You are a samurai and your ability to focus is your sword. If you consciously control your mind and center it on your breathing, relaxation, and the act of stretching, you are sharpening your sword. If you let your mind wander around to whatever it wants to think about, you are making your sword dull and getting very little benefit out of the stretching routines. The more you practice the ability to focus, the better you will be at it. And the better you get at focusing, the better you will be at managing and eliminating stress.

Tool #4: Positive Thinking

Remember that your body does not recognize the difference between real and imagined stress. The thoughts that go through your mind dramatically affect your physical body. Your mind and the thoughts that you think can turn the most beautiful day into a terrible nightmare. One of the most effective ways to become aware of how you are thinking is to do a seven-day negative thinking fast. For seven days, write down every negative thought that passes through your mind. Negative thoughts are statements like “I can’t do this,” “I wish I was better looking (more athletic, skinnier, etc.),” “I will never have enough (time, money, etc.).”

These thoughts cause tension and stress in our physical body. Think of it this way: when your mind thinks in a way that makes the body want to escape the situation, it will cause stress. It is fine to have ambitions, goals and dreams; however, negative thinking is counter-productive to your dreams. Negative thinking cuts off your creative energy. So during your seven-day negative thinking fast, only allow positive thoughts to enter your mind. If a negative thought enters your mind, write it down and eliminate it from your mind. Throughout the seven days you will probably begin to notice that you think in patterns. Patterned thinking means that the same negative thoughts enter into your mind almost every day. Sometimes the same thought even enters your mind at the same time of the day, day after day. Most often this can occur for years without you even knowing it. The problem is that this negative thinking is not helpful and is actually harmful to your physical and emotional health. Taking part in a seven-day negative thinking fast helps you become aware of your thinking patterns so that you can begin to control your thoughts and manage your stress effectively.

Tool #5: Stretching

It may seem a bit redundant that stretching is included in the Stretch Tool Belt. But it’s worth mentioning because stretching is the overall vehicle that brings everything together. Stretching is the most effective tool to manage stress. It can be done anywhere and at anytime. Remember that you must make stretching a daily routine in order to see long term benefits in your overall stress levels. While it is true that immediately after a stretching session you will notice significant reductions in your stress levels, the most significant benefit will be achieved in the long-term from regular stretching routines.

Tool #6: Triggers

A trigger is a cue that reminds you to do your stretches. If you are at work and you frequently get up to get a drink of water, you can set this as a trigger. Before you get up to get a drink of water, go through your complete stretching routine. The thought of getting a drink of water is your trigger. This can be done at home, too. For example, if you are watching an hour of television, you can consciously set up the commercials to be your stretching triggers. If there are six commercials totaling three minutes, that gives you three minutes to go through your stretches. In an hour, you may be able to do 13-15 minutes of stretching without missing your favorite shows.

Setting up stretching triggers can be fun and easy. Think of something that you do regularly on a daily basis. These can include using the restroom, waking up, going to bed, eating a meal, or even finishing a telephone conversation. All of these events can be set up as triggers.

The Stretches

Alright, so without further ado, here is my complete list of stretching exercises. Take a look and let me know if you’ve got any questions in the comments section!

Shoulder Shrugs

Duration: 10 shrugs

Part of Body: Shoulders

Type of Stretch: Dynamic

Cocoon Stretch

Duration: 30-45 seconds

Part of Body: Low Back

Type of Stretch: Static

 

Seated Rhomboid Pull

Duration: 30 seconds

Part of Body: Back

Type of Stretch: Static

 

Parallel Leg Stretch

Duration: 30 seconds

Part of Body: Legs

Type of Stretch: Static

 

Spinal Twist

This stretch is absolutely one of my favorites to stretch out the back.

Duration: 30 seconds

Part of Body: Back

Type of Stretch: Static

 

Elbow Oscillations

Duration: 15 oscillations but you can do these much longer if you like. That’s totally fine.

Part of Body: Elbow

Type of Stretch: Oscillatory

 

Rag Doll

Duration: 30 seconds

Part of Body: Low Back

Type of Stretch: Static

Bobble Head Stretch

Duration: 10-15 oscillations per side

Part of Body: Neck

Type of Stretch: Oscillatory

Ankle Circles

Duration: 15 rotations each direction per foot

Part of Body: Ankle

Type of Stretch: Dynamic

Neck Rolls

Duration: 15 rotations each direction

Part of Body: Neck

Type of Stretch: Dynamic

Steeple Stretch

Duration: 30 seconds or feel free to do it longer. This stretch really feels good!

Part of Body: Rib cage

Type of Stretch: Static

Standing Rag Doll


Duration: 30 seconds

Part of Body: Back

Type of Stretch: Static

Wrist Flicks

Duration: 20-30 repetitions each side

Part of Body: Wrists

Type of Stretch: Oscillatory

Swinging Fan

Duration: 20-30 repetitions

Part of Body: Back

Type of Stretch: Oscillatory

Tricep Stretch

You can use a towel or your hand. Either is fine.

Duration: 30 seconds

Part of Body: Triceps

Type of Stretch: Static

Frog Sit Stretch

Duration: 30 seconds

Part of Body: Low Back/Hips

Type of Stretch: Static

STRETCHING FOR PAIN RELIEF

Will stretching help reduce pain?

When you are stressed, your muscles tighten in response to the fight-or-flight response. Over time the constant tension turns into dense muscle tissue called fibrosis. This fibrosis impinges on nerves in the neck, low back and other areas. If you have ever had a massage you may have noticed that you typically feel better afterward. For example, you visit a massage therapist because you have neck pain. Afterward, your neck pain is gone. There is a physiological reason for this. Before the massage, there were dense muscle fibers caused by stress. The massage therapist, through massage and stretching, “broke up” the muscle tissue and the nerves were no longer impinged. This is why stretching is such an effective technique for relieving pain in the muscles.

 

Should stretching hurt?

Stretching should not hurt. If you are feeling pain during a stretch you should stop immediately. At the start of a stretch you will feel pulling on the muscle. This must happen in order for the muscle to lengthen. Typically as you relax into a stretch the tension will decrease and you will be able to go further into the stretch.

Warrior Stretch

Duration: 30 seconds

Part of Body: Chest

Type of Stretch: Static

Shoulder Shrugs Stretch

Duration: 10 shrugs

Part of Body: Shoulders

Type of Stretch: Dynamic

Spinal Twist With Wall

Duration: 30 seconds

Part of Body: Back

Type of Stretch: Static

Foot Tapping

Duration: 15-20 repetitions

Part of Body: Ankles

Type of Stretch: Oscillatory

Horizontal Neck Stretch

Duration: 30 seconds

Part of Body: Neck

Type of Stretch: Static

Forearm Stretch

Duration: 30 seconds

Part of Body: Forearm

Type of Stretch: Static

 

Toe Stretch – Fan em out!

Duration: 15 repetitions

Part of Body: Toes/Feet

Type of Stretch: Oscillatory

Runner’s Hamstring Stretch

Duration: 30 seconds

Part of Body: Legs

Type of Stretch: Static

Arm Oscillation

This stretch will start to move fluid in your shoulder and help with rehab.

Duration: 15 rotations per arm

Part of Body: Shoulder

Type of Stretch: Oscillatory

Lunging Calf Stretch

Stretch out the calves are super important to prevent injury in your ankles.

Duration: 30 seconds

Part of Body: Calf muscle

Type of Stretch: Static

Standing Quad Stretch


Duration: 30 seconds

Part of Body: Legs

Type of Stretch: Static

Face Stretch

Duration: 15 seconds

Part of Body: Face

Type of Stretch: Dynamic

Seated Ankle Circles

Duration: 20-30 repetitions each direction per leg

Part of Body: Ankles

Type of Stretch: Dynamic

Shoulder Rolls

Duration: 20 rolls each direction

Part of Body: Shoulders

Type of Stretch: Dynamic

Laying Rag Doll

Duration: 30-45 seconds

Part of Body: Low Back

Type of Stretch: Static

Pelvis Twists

This stretch is also know as the Elvis’.

Duration: 15 rotations each direction

Part of Body: Low Back/Hips

Type of Stretch: Dynamic

Angled Neck Stretch

Duration: 30 seconds each side

Part of Body: Neck

Type of Stretch: Static

Straight Arm Corner Stretch


Duration: 30 seconds

Part of Body: Chest

Type of Stretch: Static

Back Forearm Stretch

This stretch is similar to prayer stretch and feels really good.

Duration: 30 seconds

Part of Body: Forearm/Wrist

Type of Stretch: Static

Prayer Stretch

Duration: 30 seconds

Part of Body: Wrists/Forearms

Type of Stretch: Static

Arm Circles

Duration: 15 rotations each direction per arm

Part of Body: Shoulders

Type of Stretch: Dynamic

 

The Stretching Routines

Morning and Night Mini Stretch Routine

Stretching is a great way to wake yourself up in the morning. It invigorates the body, circulates blood flow and prepares your body for the day. This mini routine is best done right after you wake up and just before you go to bed.
Duration: 5 minutes

For: Face, Neck, Upper Body

Stretches: Face Scrunching, Neck Rolls, Steeple Stretch, Oscillatory Side Bends

Morning and Night Mini Stretch Routine

Stretching is a great way to wake yourself up in the morning. It invigorates the body, circulates blood flow and prepares your body for the day. This mini routine is best done right after you wake up and just before you go to bed.
Duration: 5 minutes

For: Face, Neck, Upper Body

Stretches: Face Scrunching, Neck Rolls, Steeple Stretch, Oscillatory Side Bends

 

Stretch Routine For Neck Pain

Description: For the majority of people, stress accumulates in the neck region. This can cause stiffness and pain throughout your day. Use this very effective routine to eliminate stress and tension from your neck region.
Duration: 6 1/2 minutes

For: Neck

Stretches: Neck Rolls, Look Behind, Angled Neck Stretch, Shoulder Rolls, Shoulder Shrugs

 

Stretch Routine While Watching TV

Description: The time spent while watching television can be a great opportunity to perform your daily stretches. Use this routine to eliminate stress without missing your favorite television programs.
Duration: 8 minutes

For: Whole Body

Stretches: Angled Neck Stretch, Shoulder Shrugs, Push-out Stretch, Butterfly, Cradle the Leg, Runner’s Spinal Twist, Runner’s Hamstring Stretch

 

Fast Acting Relaxation Stretch Routine

This is quick relaxation routine that can be done while at home. Use it as a potent tool to eliminate stress in a short amount of time.

Duration: 3 1/2 minutes

For: Upper Body

Stretches: Shoulder Rolls, Look at the Moon, Rag Doll with Chair, Superman Stretch

Mini Morning & Night Stretch Routine

Description: Stretching is a great way to wake yourself up in the morning. It invigorates the body, circulates blood flow and prepares your body for the day. This mini routine is best done right after you wake up and just before you go to bed.

Duration: 5 minutes

For: Face, Neck, Upper Body

Stretches: Face Scrunching, Neck Rolls, Steeple Stretch, Oscillatory Side Bends

Extended Stretch Routine At Your Desk

Description: If you are sitting at your desk for long periods of time it can lead to pain in many areas of your body. Taking the time to relieve this built up stress and tension is an important part of taking care of your body. Use this extended routine to relieve stress and tension in many parts of your body, all while sitting at your desk.

Duration: 8 1/2 minutes

For: Whole body

Stretches: Angled Neck Stretch, Neck Rolls, Shoulder Shrugs, Warrior Stretch, Spinal Twist, Rag Doll, Drawing the Alphabet, Hand Shakes

Stretch Routine While On Airplane

Long airplane rides are notorious for causing tension and stress throughout your entire body. Instead of letting this stress build up in your body while on the plane, eliminate it with this powerful airplane stretch routine.

Duration: 7 minutes

For: Whole Body

Stretches: Angled Neck Stretch, Shoulder Shrugs, Push-out Stretch, Hand Stretch, Tricep Stretch, Standing Quad Stretch, Lunging Calf Stretch

Stretch Routine for Travelers

Taking frequent rest breaks while traveling can lead to a more enjoyable vacation because your body will not be bogged down by stress and tension. This routine was developed for travelers to eliminate stress quickly and efficiently.

Duration: 11 minutes

For: Whole Body

Stretches: Neck Turns, Shoulder Rolls, Push-out Stretch, Tricep Stretch, Rag Doll, Spinal Twist with Wall, Standing Quad Stretch, Pelvis Twists, Lunging Calf Stretch

Mini Stretch Routine At Your Desk

Sitting at your desk all day can cause many structural problems in your body. These problems can lead to pain in many areas including your neck and low back. Do this short mini-routine as a fast-acting tool to relieve stress in your neck and low back.

Duration: 2 1/2 minutes

For: Neck, Chest, Low Back

Stretches: Angled Neck Stretch, Warrior Stretch, Rag Doll

Show/Hide Comments (5 comments)
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5 Comments
  1. Mary Yager

    HOW TO DO CORNER STRETCH PUSH
    OUTS FACING AWAY FROM THE CORNER WITH YOUR FOREARMS ON THE WALL ALMOST LIKE THE REGULAR CORNER STRETCH WITH FOREARMS ON THE WALL AND NOSE TURNED TOWARD THE CORNER OF THE WALL. THANK YOU
    P.S. I LOOKED EVERYWHERE THAT I KNEW AND COULD NOT FIND ANY KIND OF EXERCISE AS MY THERAPIST HAD DIRECTED ME TO DO WITHOUT A DIAGRAM.

    Reply
    • Todd Kuslikis

      Hi Mary,

      Sorry that wasn’t clear. You do that stretch facing the wall with your palms on the walls above head level.

      – Todd

      Reply
  2. Steve rogers

    Realy interesting article todd, especialy the peice about the breathing !.
    I sustained an injury to my thigh muscles and they have pulled up tight into my hip joint, im having to do alot of breathing excercises to relax my diaphram which in turn should relax my muscles.
    It was interesting to see it written down on paper how the disphram gets tight and your breathing struggles to cope !.
    Great stuff,
    Thanks todd

    Reply
  3. Steve

    Wow Todd, just wow. This time I feel you’ve really outdone even yourself. This is probably the most extensive and helpful stretching article on the net. I already shared it on Twitter to spread the word. Awesome, amazing job! Just to mention one thing I really liked is your Triggers. Fantastic tip! It reminds me of the Grease the Groove technique, where you do a certain exercises at random times throughout the day without going to failure. You have to have triggers with Grease the Groove too (for example when you walk past your pull up bar you do 4-5 pull ups, do a few push ups when you get up from your office chair, or do some pistol squats before you drink a glass of water as you mentioned). I know the importance of stretching but I never get around to doing it, so using triggers could be an awesome way to change that. Thanks for the tip!

    Reply
    • Todd Kuslikis

      Appreciated Steve. Thanks for the kind words.

      – Todd

      Reply
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